UT Health Northeast’s five physician residency programs successfully recruit highly qualified candidates

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April 10, 2017
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UT Health Northeast’s five physician residency programs successfully recruit highly qualified candidates

April 10, 2017

The five physician residency programs at UT Health Northeast have successfully filled their respective programs with highly qualified physicians.

The Family Medicine Residency Program welcomed eight new physicians, the Occupational Medicine Residency Program accepted two physicians, the Psychiatry Residency Program accepted six physicians, the Rural Track Family Medicine Program welcomed two physicians, and the Internal Medicine Residency Program at CHRISTUS Good Shepherd Health System in Longview accepted 12 physicians. CHRISTUS Good Shepherd’s residency program is sponsored by UT Health.

During the annual match process, medical school graduates who are interested in family medicine, psychiatry, rural track family medicine, or internal medicine, interview at selected residency programs throughout the United States. They then send their preferences to the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), which ranks the residency programs in the order of each new physician’s interest. Physicians in occupational medicine are placed through a process outside the NRMP.

Each residency program also sends a list ranking graduates according to its preferences to the matching program. The lists are then matched and all participants notified of the results.

UT Health’s new family medicine resident physicians and the medical schools they graduated from are: Tyler Arendt, M.D., University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; Matthew Cook, D.O, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, Missouri; Anthony Handoyo, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Sahar Jamalyaria, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Rezwana Rahman, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Adam Ulibarri, M.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque; Renny Varghese, M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston; and Linh Vo, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth.

New occupational medicine residents are: Marco Britton, M.D., Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield; and Paul Scanlan, M.D., Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk.

New psychiatry residents are: Ashlee Blaine, D.O., Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, Missouri; Cai Chen, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Andrew Oshiro, M.D., University of Texas School of Medicine, San Antonio; Eyuel Terefe, M.D., University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City; Tabitha Trapasso, M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston; and Benjamin Van Leeuwen, M.D., University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine.

New rural track family medicine residents are: Moises Plasencia, M.D., Texas Tech University of Health Sciences Center Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Lubbock; and Christian Ferrer, M.D., Ross University School of Medicine at Portsmouth, Dominica.

New internal medicine residents at CHRISTUS Good Shepherd are: Loren Albritton, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Tara Brayboy, M.D., Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.; Xinyu Cao, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Ramy Elhalwagi, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Olubadewa Fatunde, M.D., University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago; Amal Ghneim, D.O., Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth; Nadia Jamil, M.D., Texas Tech University of Health Sciences Center Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Lubbock; Pooja Naik, M.D., American University of Antigua College of Medicine, Antigua; Gladys Ogbonna, M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston; Dhruv Rajpurohit, D.O., Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Carolinas Campus, Spartanburg; Christopher Ross, M.D., Ross University School of Medicine, Portsmouth, Dominica; and Kevin Saunders, D.O., Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Robert Tompkins, M.D., is the program director of the Family Medicine Residency Program. Jeffrey Levin, M.D., is the program director of the Occupational Medicine Residency Program. Jeffery Matthews, M.D., is the program director of the Psychiatry Residency Program. Les Tingle, M.D., is the program director of the Rural Track Family Medicine Residency Program. Emmanuel Elueze, M.D., is program director for the residency program at CHRISTUS Good Shepherd Health System.

UT Health Northeast’s Family Medicine Residency Program began in 1985. It is a three-year program and has graduated 178 physicians. More than half of these have stayed in East Texas. The Occupational Medicine Residency Program began in 1994 and has graduated 35 physicians. UT Health’s Psychiatry Residency Program is new and begins July 1. It is a four-year program. The Rural Track Family Medicine Program began in 2016, and will go into the second year of training in July. CHRISTUS Good Shepherd’s Internal Medicine Residency Program lasts three years. Its third class will graduate in June.

All UT Health Northeast residency programs are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

For 70 years, UT Health Northeast has provided excellent patient care to the citizens of Texas and beyond. Signature programs include cancer, chest diseases, primary care, behavioral health, and public and community health, along with over 25 additional medical specialties. As the only university medical center in Northeast Texas, its mission also includes education and research. Graduate medical education residencies are in family medicine, rural family medicine, internal medicine, occupational medicine, and psychiatry with many newly trained physicians electing to stay in Northeast Texas, a medically underserved region of the state. Graduate degrees include biotechnology and public health. In addition, scientists in the Center for Biomedical Research have been awarded more than $137 million in competitive funding since 2004. With an annual operating budget of over $200 million, UT Health Northeast is a major economic engine for the region.

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